Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Advanced Screenwriting
AS.061.404 (01)

Intensive workshop course where students will write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Classes will focus on the specific challenges of the students’ works-in-progress, with an emphasis on developing a story idea that is suitable for a feature, and the craft to see it through to completion. Particular emphasis will be placed on the feature screenwriter’s central challenge: creating enough of a structure in the early writing stages to keep the screenplay on track, while remaining open to new ideas for scenes and sequences that inevitably arise as the characters come to life. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed—to explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. Students will aim to have a solid and workable first draft at the end of the semester, at which point avenues for further revision may be discussed. Throughout the course, Instructor will also devote a portion of class time to discuss the business of screenwriting. Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:30PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room: The Centre 206
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design, creation, and revision of the screenplay. Specifically, we will focus on learning the craft of screenwriting — strategies, processes, and philosophies that writers can develop, practice, and rely upon as they progress through a series of screenwriting exercises and write three short screenplays, which will be critiqued in-class during weekly table reads and with the Instructor (one-on-one) during office hours. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed — to further explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room: The Centre 206
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/11
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy
AS.214.479 (01)

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Contemporary Israeli Poetry
AS.216.300 (01)

This course examines the works of major Israeli poets such as Yehuda Amichai, Nathan Zach, Dalia Rabikovitch, Erez Biton, Roni Somek, Dan Pagis, Yona Wollach, Yair Horwitz, Maya Bejerano, and Yitzhak Laor. Against the background of the poetry of these famous poets we will study recent developments and trends in Israeli poetry, including less known figures such as Mois Benarroch, Shva Salhoov and Almog Behar. Through close reading of the poems, the course will trace the unique style and aesthetic of each poet, and will aim at presenting a wide picture of contemporary Hebrew poetry.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy
AS.214.479 (02)

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 11:00AM - 11:59AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Hodson 216
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/6
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (01)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Scalise, Gregory John
  • Room: Krieger 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (02)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Dries, Emma D
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (03)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (04)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Fallis, Lewis B
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (05)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Storytelling for Film and Fiction
AS.061.148 (01)

Through the analysis of narrative films, short fiction, myths, fairy tales, and ghost stories, and through the workshopping of their own creative writing, students will explore the art and science of "a good story well told." The course will offer an introduction to dramatic and visual storytelling, and is an essential primer for upper-level screenwriting. Lab fee $50.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Bucknell, Lucy
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (15)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rentz, Aleyna S
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Poetry: How Does A Poem Mean?
AS.220.201 (01)

"For what does the poem mean? is too often a self-destroying approach to poetry. A more useful way of asking the question is How does a poem mean? Why does it build itself into a form out of images, ideas, rhythms? How do these elements become the meaning?" --John Ciardi In this course, we will explore the myriad ways poets create and complicate meaning using the tools of (for our sake) the English language. We will consider how poetry can convince and/or delight the reader through form, rhyme, meter, metaphor, etc., and how poems sometimes arrive at multiple meanings through play in the language. We will build on your knowledge of prosody from IFP I & II, learning to utilize it as generative rather than restricting. The course will focus primarily on workshop, with readings and assignments intended to develop your understanding of the different ways a poem can work.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kemler, Kimberly R.
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Introduction to Fiction: Character and Consequence
AS.220.200 (03)

Character and plot are inextricably bound in fiction: events reveal character at the same time that character affects the story’s events. In this workshop-intensive class, we’ll look at how how elements such as dialogue, point of view, and action work together to create complex characters. Over the course of the semester, students will write and workshop two stories, as well as turning in a revision. We’ll study character in a range of published fiction: minimalist and maximalist, realistic and speculative, classic and contemporary. This class builds on the foundation of IFP I and II and will prepare students for work in upper-level fiction classes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Noel, Katharine
  • Room: Gilman 79
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Introduction to Poetry: Song and Image
AS.220.201 (02)

What is poetry? There’s no one answer, but it began with song and ritual, and it makes its “argument” by means of imagery. Students will read song lyrics and write their own, and think about distinctions between oral and written poetry. Our focus on the ear will lead to the eye: the role of imagery in making a reader “see.” Readings may include Wordsworth, Keats, Owen, Moore, Bishop, Walcott, Heaney, Tracy K. Smith, as well as blues, jazz, and Broadway lyrics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Salter, Mary Jo
  • Room: Gilman 79
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Freshman Seminar:Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (04)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Reese, Matthew
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Nichols, Stephen
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (14)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Danklin, Deirdre M
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (08)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Atherton, Chase E.
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (07)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Baez, Elias
  • Room: Mattin Center 161
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (10)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kemler, Kimberly R.
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (11)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Nguyen, Nancy
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (06)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Huff, Sawyer Polk
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (09)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Danklin, Deirdre M
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (12)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Crigger, Catherine H
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (13)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Atherton, Chase E.
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (18)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Crigger, Catherine H
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction: Fiction Past, Fiction Present, Fiction Future
AS.220.200 (02)

This course will prepare you for upper level fiction courses by asking you to think about structural choices, characterization, thematic questions, and use of language, in your own work and in the assigned reading. During the semester, students will turn in two short writing exercises and one 10-15 page short story for workshop discussion. Students will complete an additional 5-10 page story for the final portfolio. The course reading invites you to think about writing as participating in a long conversation across time. Each week, we will read and discuss one story by a writer who is by now considered canonical or influential, and one published story from the last few years. We will think about the ways that writers engage, respond to, adapt, or even argue with the canon that informs their work. These discussions will prepare us to talk about the capacity of the story form, our individual aesthetic preferences, and your aspirations for your own creative work.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Evans, Danielle V
  • Room: Bloomberg 278
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (16)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kemler, Kimberly R.
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (19)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Rentz, Aleyna S
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (01)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Cheney, Samuel D
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic Tension
AS.220.200 (01)

Conflict is often referred to as the heart or the engine of a story: in this workshop-centered course, we will investigate conflict within short fiction, giving attention to all its related components, such as narrative structure, pacing, character development, and dialogue. Both in workshop and in our weekly discussions of assigned readings, we will always return to the question of how a story provokes readers’ sense of anticipation and keeps readers engaged. This course builds upon the material covered in the Introduction to Fiction and Poetry course sequence and will prepare students for further study at the Intermediate and Advanced levels. Course readings include a wide range of classic and contemporary writing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Shannon L
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (17)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Nguyen, Nancy
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (02)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Cheney, Samuel D
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Nonfiction
AS.220.108 (01)

A course in realist fiction and nonfiction, with readings by Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James; George Orwell, Beryl Markham and Truman Capote. Students compose short stories and essays with attention to literary models. AS.220.105 can be substituted for AS.220.108.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
  • Instructor: Cavanaugh-Simpson, Joanne
  • Room: Gilman 138D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Fiction Workshop
AS.220.401 (02)

The capstone course in writing fiction, primarily devoted to workshop of student stories. Some assignments, some discussion of literary models, two or three completed student stories with revisions. Completion of Intermediate Fiction is required for admission. (Formerly AS.220.355)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Leithauser, Brad
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Writing about Science I: Daily News Journalism
AS.220.206 (01)

This course is designed to teach students the skills of daily news reporting, with a focus on covering science news. Students will learn how turn scientific discoveries into lively and engaging prose for the general public, interview sources, and pitch stories to news organizations. The skills taught are applicable to all areas of journalism, not just science journalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Grimm, David
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI

Reading Contemporary Korean Fiction in Translation
AS.220.230 (01)

This course examines a range of contemporary Korean fiction produced since political liberalization of Korea in the 1990s. Students will see the many different ways in which individual selves relate to the world, question the value systems of a globalized society, and celebrate the instinct to survive and thrive. While exploring these things, students will develop their analytical skills and identify the central components of new Korean narratives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Kyeong-soo
  • Room: Krieger 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Intermediate Fiction: Plot and Narrative Structure
AS.220.333 (01)

This class is primarily a workshop. Students will write two 10-20 page short stories to present for discussion and critique. The craft focus of the class is plot and narrative structure. Through the assigned reading and a few short writing exercises, we will think about storytelling and the elements (character, conflict, desire, causality, consequence) that make a question a plot or narrative question, and how stories are shaped and structured by these questions. The course reading will begin with a variety of short stories. Later in the semester, we will discuss braided narratives and read novels by Virginia Woolf, Rebecca Makkai and Valeria Luiselli.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Evans, Danielle V
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Playwriting Strategies
AS.225.330 (01)

A seminar and workshop in playwriting with Dr. Joe Martin, playwright and dramaturge. Student writers, developing their plays, will learn how to open up to the creative process, “brainstorm,” refine their work, and shape it toward an act of artistic communication. Writer’s techniques, such as attending to plot or “story,” delineation of character, creating effective “dialog,” even overcoming “writer’s block,” will be addressed. This course is designed to be complementary to – not a replacement for – playwriting classes in the Writing Seminars.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Martin, Joseph H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore Schools
AS.220.415 (01)

In this course, students will work alongside writing teachers from the non-profit organization Writers in Baltimore Schools (WBS) to lead creative writing workshops in local public middle schools. Students and WBS teachers will also meet as a group once a week to plan classes, discuss pedagogy, and share ideas. Students will write weekly responses to reading assignments, write reflections on the volunteer experience, and help to assemble a final project at their worksite. Upon completion of the class, students will have the opportunity to apply to become instructors with Writers in Baltimore Schools.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Noel, Katharine
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

Readings in Fiction: The Novella
AS.220.427 (01)

A study of the novella as a literary form. Authors may include Melville, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Kafka, James, Wharton, Baldwin, Porter, Rulfo, Smiley, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Puchner, Roderic P
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ender, Evelyne
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Readings in Poetry: International Voices
AS.220.443 (01)

International voices will combine the workshopping of poems by students with a study of contemporary poems written by black British writers and British writers in dialect, African-American writers, Caribbean writers, and Indian and South African poets who are writing in English. The study of broad themes and subjects will be combined with a particular appreciation of linguistic and acoustic matters - which means among other things that time will be spent listening to and evaluating recordings of the poets concerned. Writing Seminars Majors Only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Motion, Andrew P
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms
AS.220.377 (01)

Poetic Forms I fulfills one of the Intermediate requirements for The Writing Seminars Major. It deals with rhyme, meter, traditional forms, and ad hoc forms of students' own making. Whether you are a poet, novelist, song writer, science writer, or dramatist, this course will help you master lines and sentences even better.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Williamson, Greg W
  • Room: Bloomberg 168
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Advanced Fiction Workshop
AS.220.401 (01)

The capstone course in writing fiction, primarily devoted to workshop of student stories. Some assignments, some discussion of literary models, two or three completed student stories with revisions. Completion of Intermediate Fiction is required for admission. (Formerly AS.220.355)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: McGarry, Jean
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Intermediate Fiction and Poetry: Poet-Novelists
AS.220.332 (01)

We will look at writers in English who excelled at both fiction and poetry. We will ask: How does a talent in one genre show itself in another? Novels will include: Thomas Hardy’s Return of the Native, Sylvia Townsend Warner’s Lolly Willowes, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, John Updike’s, Rabbit, Run. Other writers who may be included: Rudyard Kipling, D. H. Lawrence, Malcolm Lowry, Richard Wright, Muriel Spark.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Leithauser, Brad
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET, WRIT-FICT

Advanced Poetry Workshop
AS.220.400 (01)

The capstone course in poetry writing. Consideration of various poetic models in discussion, some assigned writing, primarily workshop of student poems. Students will usually complete a “collection” of poems. (Formerly AS.220.396.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Motion, Andrew P
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Fiction: Fictional Frames
AS.220.398 (01)

In this course, we'll focus on writing and workshopping student fiction while reading contemporary parallel texts representing a variety of styles, subgenres, and forms. We'll look at exceptionally short works, stories of intermediate lengths, and longer, novella-length works in an effort to understand what kinds of stories lend themselves to particular lengths and styles. How do you know whether your story should be a work of flash fiction or a novel? What kinds of stories can you tell in each form? We'll read work by Lydia Davis, Kirstin Valdez Quade, Jenny Zhang, Bret Anthony Johnston, Paul Yoon, Lauren Groff, Bryan Washington, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room: Krieger 308
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Modernist Literature and Film
AS.220.221 (01)

This course explores the exchange of ideas and techniques between modernist literature and cinema in response to the social and technological changes of the twentieth century. Prominent figures include Charlie Chaplin, Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, Sergei Eisenstein, Jean Epstein, John Dos Passos, Zora Neale Hurston, Paul Strand, and Gertrude Stein. Participants will write weekly assignments on films and readings from a critical perspective.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Stine, Kyle J.
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Writing about the Arts
AS.220.313 (01)

Learn the practice of arts journalism, from reviewing to conducting interviews and writing profiles. In class, students will study the work of some of the best writers in this field, pitch story ideas, report and write, and then discuss their pieces in a workshop setting. Instruction will include journalistic ethics, plagiarism, libel law, and use of social media. Students can expect class visits from established journalists. Writing Seminars Majors only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 12:00PM - 2:30PM
  • Instructor: Smith, Sarah Harrison
  • Room: Gilman 79
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.061.404 (01)Advanced ScreenwritingTh 3:30PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingF 3:00PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206FILM-SCRWRT
AS.214.479 (01)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.216.300 (01)Contemporary Israeli PoetryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStahl, NetaGilman 313
AS.214.479 (02)Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine ComedyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM, Th 11:00AM - 11:59AMStephens, Walter EHodson 216ENGL-PR1800
AS.220.105 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMScalise, Gregory JohnKrieger 304
AS.220.105 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDries, Emma DMattin Center 162
AS.220.105 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMUllmann, Stephanie MHodson 305
AS.220.105 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMFallis, Lewis BBloomberg 276
AS.220.105 (05)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMStarr, MarloSmokler Center Library
AS.061.148 (01)Storytelling for Film and FictionT 3:00PM - 5:30PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyOlin 305FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.105 (15)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRentz, Aleyna SGilman 219
AS.220.201 (01)Introduction to Poetry: How Does A Poem Mean?F 1:30PM - 4:00PMKemler, Kimberly R.Gilman 413WRIT-POET
AS.220.200 (03)Introduction to Fiction: Character and ConsequenceW 1:30PM - 4:00PMNoel, KatharineGilman 79WRIT-FICT
AS.220.201 (02)Introduction to Poetry: Song and ImageTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSalter, Mary JoGilman 79WRIT-POET
AS.360.133 (04)Freshman Seminar:Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMReese, MatthewLevering Arellano
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNichols, StephenLevering Arellano
AS.220.105 (14)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDanklin, Deirdre MBloomberg 178
AS.220.105 (08)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAtherton, Chase E.Gilman 75
AS.220.105 (07)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMBaez, EliasMattin Center 161
AS.220.105 (10)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKemler, Kimberly R.Gilman 400
AS.220.105 (11)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNguyen, NancyGreenhouse 113
AS.220.105 (06)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMHuff, Sawyer PolkSmokler Center 301
AS.220.105 (09)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDanklin, Deirdre MBloomberg 178
AS.220.105 (12)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCrigger, Catherine HGilman 377
AS.220.105 (13)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAtherton, Chase E.Gilman 75
AS.220.105 (18)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCrigger, Catherine HGilman 377
AS.220.200 (02)Introduction to Fiction: Fiction Past, Fiction Present, Fiction FutureTh 3:00PM - 5:20PMEvans, Danielle VBloomberg 278WRIT-FICT
AS.220.105 (16)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKemler, Kimberly R.Gilman 400
AS.220.105 (19)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRentz, Aleyna SGilman 219
AS.220.106 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMCheney, Samuel DGilman 413
AS.220.200 (01)Introduction to Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic TensionM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRobinson, Shannon LMaryland 202WRIT-FICT
AS.220.105 (17)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNguyen, NancyGreenhouse 113
AS.220.106 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCheney, Samuel DGilman 413
AS.220.108 (01)Introduction to Fiction & NonfictionT 6:00PM - 8:30PMCavanaugh-Simpson, JoanneGilman 138D
AS.220.401 (02)Advanced Fiction WorkshopW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLeithauser, BradMaryland 104WRIT-FICT
AS.220.206 (01)Writing about Science I: Daily News JournalismF 4:00PM - 6:30PMGrimm, DavidGilman 277MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.220.230 (01)Reading Contemporary Korean Fiction in TranslationW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, Kyeong-sooKrieger 308WRIT-FICT
AS.220.333 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Plot and Narrative StructureW 3:00PM - 5:20PMEvans, Danielle VGilman 132WRIT-FICT
AS.225.330 (01)Playwriting StrategiesW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph H 
AS.220.415 (01)Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore SchoolsM 4:00PM - 6:20PMNoel, KatharineMaryland 217CSC-CE
AS.220.427 (01)Readings in Fiction: The NovellaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMPuchner, Roderic PMattin Center 162WRIT-FICT
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMEnder, EvelyneLevering Arellano
AS.220.443 (01)Readings in Poetry: International VoicesT 3:00PM - 5:20PMMotion, Andrew PGreenhouse 113WRIT-POET
AS.220.377 (01)Intermediate Poetry: Poetic FormsW 3:00PM - 5:20PMWilliamson, Greg WBloomberg 168WRIT-POET
AS.220.401 (01)Advanced Fiction WorkshopT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMcGarry, JeanBloomberg 178WRIT-FICT
AS.220.332 (01)Intermediate Fiction and Poetry: Poet-NovelistsT 3:00PM - 5:20PMLeithauser, BradBloomberg 276WRIT-POET, WRIT-FICT
AS.220.400 (01)Advanced Poetry WorkshopM 3:00PM - 5:20PMMotion, Andrew PGilman 400WRIT-POET
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPatton, ElizabethLevering Arellano
AS.220.398 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Fictional FramesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrown, Nathanael AKrieger 308WRIT-FICT
AS.220.221 (01)Modernist Literature and FilmF 1:30PM - 4:00PMStine, Kyle J.Gilman 134
AS.220.313 (01)Writing about the ArtsT 12:00PM - 2:30PMSmith, Sarah HarrisonGilman 79