Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: The Poetry of Music - Lyrics and the Art of Songwriting
AS.001.113 (01)

In this First-Year Seminar we will examine the poetic artistry of American song, from Tin-Pan Alley and Broadway tunes to Folk songs, Billboard’s Top 40, and Hip Hop. Our focus will be on the linguistic art of song – the meaning(s), rhythm, timbre, and pitch found in words alone. Taught in a workshop format, the course will encourage students to read lyrics as poetry and then write their own.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Celenza, Anna
  • Room: Shaffer 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design, creation, and revision of the screenplay. Specifically, we will focus on learning the craft of screenwriting — strategies, processes, and philosophies that writers can develop, practice, and rely upon as they progress through a series of screenwriting exercises and write a 12-page screenplay, which will be critiqued in-class during weekly table reads and with the Instructor (one-on-one) during office hours. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed — to further explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. (Scripts and clips often selected from American films spanning the 60s through the 2000s.) Final Draft screenwriting software is required; a FREE 18-week trial will be made available for all students who don’t already have Final Draft.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room: The Centre 206  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

The Fallen World: Morally Complex Storytelling
AS.061.312 (01)

A workshop devoted to creating complex characters in challenging moral landscapes. Students will view and discuss a wide range of films; and creative assignments may include profiles, short fiction, monologues, and dramatic scenes for the screen. Short critical and creative written exercises, and a longer, creative final project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Bucknell, Lucy
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Intermediate Screenwriting
AS.061.373 (01)

This course will explore strategy and process for developing a short screenplay from pre-existing literary or journalistic source material (short story, news/feature article, etc.). By exploring several “case studies” — feature films and the source material that inspired them — students will identify the practical strategies employed by professional screenwriters with the goal of employing such strategies with their own screenplay adaptations. Bulk of class will focus on designing, writing, and rewriting a 20-30 page screenplay, and sharing multiple drafts with the class (and with the professor one-on-one) for critique over the course of the semester. Each student should have 2-3 pieces of material under consideration for possible adaptation by the start of class. Discussions from time to time will also touch on the business of screenwriting. (Scripts and clips often selected from American films spanning the 60s through the 2000s.) Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99. Students are expected to have previously completed AS.061.205 or another lower level screenwriting class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room: The Centre 206  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (01)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hupp, Spencer Martin
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (02)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Raszick, Landen Blaine
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (03)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Guida, Dominic Michael
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (04)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kessler, Brett C
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (05)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (06)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Davien Allen
  • Room: Krieger 205  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (07)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Emmons, Eric Dayton
  • Room: Gilman 17  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (08)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Kessler, Brett C
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (09)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Blansett, Nathan Michael
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (10)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (11)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Duffy, Daniel Joseph
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (12)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (13)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fee, Gabriella M
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (14)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Blansett, Nathan Michael
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (15)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (16)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Duffy, Daniel Joseph
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I
AS.220.105 (17)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II
AS.220.106 (01)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Neugebauer, Samantha Elizabeth
  • Room: Hodson 316  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II
AS.220.106 (02)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Megan L
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II
AS.220.106 (03)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Keleher, Kate Lauren
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II
AS.220.106 (04)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Megan L
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II
AS.220.106 (05)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Keleher, Kate Lauren
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Nonfiction
AS.220.108 (01)

A course in realist fiction and nonfiction, with readings by Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James; George Orwell, Beryl Markham and Truman Capote. Students compose short stories and essays with attention to literary models. AS.220.105 can be substituted for AS.220.108.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:30PM - 8:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room: Gilman 138D  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Craft of Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic Tension
AS.220.200 (01)

“[I]n literature, only trouble is interesting,” Janet Burroway says in Writing Fiction. Conflict is often referred to as the heart or the engine of a story: in this workshop-centered course, we’ll investigate conflict within short fiction, giving attention to all its related components, such as narrative structure, pacing, character development, and dialogue. Both in workshop and in our weekly discussions of assigned readings, we’ll always return to the question of how a story provokes readers’ sense of anticipation and keeps readers engaged. This course builds upon the material covered in the Introduction to Fiction and Poetry course sequence and will prepare students for further study at the Intermediate and Advanced levels. Course readings include diverse and contemporary authors such as Han Kang, Z.Z. Packer, Carmen Maria Machado, Haruki Murakami, George Saunders, and Curtis Sittenfeld.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Shannon L
  • Room: Shaffer 302  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

The Craft of Fiction: Credible Characters
AS.220.200 (02)

Stories are inherently centered on characters, their fates, their families, their troubles, and whether they change or grow over time. In this workshop, we'll pay particular attention to how authors credibly create characters in their fiction, and we'll try our hands at building complex, nuanced characters. Students will write and workshop two original stories each and will perform extensive revisions. Each week, we'll read a contemporary story (including work by Paul Yoon, Lauren Groff, Dantiel W. Moniz, Lilian Li, Edward P. Jones, and more) that present a variety vivid, memorable characters. This course builds on ideas and themes from IFP and will prepare students for upper-level fiction courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room: Ames 320  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

The Craft of Fiction: Lyric Fiction
AS.220.200 (03)

This writing workshop will focus on musicality in prose, examining some of the effects that fiction writers can achieve through assonance, repetition, and the careful control of rhythm. We will also explore the ways in which a prose work can be unified by voice and style, even if its narrative structure is fragmented or non-linear. Throughout the semester, students will have many opportunities to write and present stories of their own. Readings will include both contemporary and non-contemporary writing from a diverse range of authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Arthur, James P
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

The Craft of Poetry: Elements and Effects
AS.220.201 (01)

This workshop-based course will focus on fundamental elements of poetry, including figurative language, diction, imagery, sound, and rhythm. Students will experience the effects of these elements in the work of diverse contemporary and historical poets, considering how different elements can complement or complicate a poem’s themes or subject. They will then experiment with these elements in their own writing, learning to combine them with greater control and intention, while remaining open to surprising results and rearrangements of poetic matter.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Malech, Dora Rachel
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

The Craft of Poetry: Wit and Delivery
AS.220.201 (02)

In Wit and Delivery, we will look at historical and contemporary poetic models with a particular eye and ear toward what makes really memorable, trenchant lines. You will have eleven assignments with specific examples to work from that get more challenging as the semester progresses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Williamson, Greg W
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Line and Lineage: Poems in Time
AS.220.212 (01)

This course will be a chronological exploration of English-language poetry, beginning in the medieval era and continuing to the present day. We will examine not only the literature of the past, but also the ways in which a diverse range of contemporary writers have extended, challenged, and reimagined literary tradition; throughout the semester we will pay especially close attention to the question of how a writer’s management of the poetic line can shape a poem's structure, context, and meaning. Although this is a lecture-based class, not a workshop, participants will have many opportunities to respond artistically to the course readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Arthur, James P
  • Room: Olin 305  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Reading Korean Literature in Translation: A Survey
AS.220.220 (01)

An introduction for students unfamiliar with the Korean language but interested in Korean culture / literature. Students will read a variety of translated texts, especially of works written in the 20th and early 21st centuries by authors including Kim Tong-in, Hwang Sun-wŏn, Pak Wansŏ, Hwang Sŏk-yŏng and Han Kang; there will also be classes on traditional sijo poetry. Students will become familiar with Korean literary genres and formal features, and develop a broad understanding of the historical and sociocultural context of Korean literature.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Kyeong-soo
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Fiction: Finishing Touches: How Stories End
AS.220.321 (01)

Typically, stories are easy to start and difficult to conclude. This course will look at various ways in which stories end rewardingly. Close attention will be paid to final paragraphs. We will ask questions like: Do satisfying endings fall into categories? Can we generalize about how stories ought to end? Do some writers have a gift for endings? Readings to include: Sylvia Townsend Warner, Muriel Spark, Alice Munro. Assignments will include both expository and creative writing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Leithauser, Brad
  • Room: Olin 305  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Intermediate Fiction: Developing Subtext
AS.220.338 (01)

In this course, students will write and workshop two original stories. Additional generative writing exercises will explore the ways a writer can develop subtext in their work. How can character details work in parallel with elements of setting? How can a setting be instrumental in advancing a plot? How can finely tuned, sentence-level details, parallel images, foreshadowing, and figurative language give a story a cohesive sensibility and rich subtext? We'll read stories by writers including Stephanie Vaughn, Laura van den Berg, Rickey Fayne, Haruki Murakami, and craft essays by Matthew Salesses, Charles Baxter, and more.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms
AS.220.377 (01)

Poetic Forms I fulfills one of the Intermediate requirements for The Writing Seminars Major. It deals with rhyme, meter, traditional forms, and ad hoc forms of students' own making. Whether you are a poet, novelist, song writer, science writer, or dramatist, this course will help you master lines and sentences even better.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Williamson, Greg W
  • Room: Gilman 132  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Performing Poetry & Fiction: An Acting Workshop for Writers
AS.220.391 (01)

This hands-on performance workshop, combining literary and theatrical practice, will look closely at what makes a performance or reading compelling, clear, and resonant. Through textual analysis, vocal technique, and group discussion, students will create a pliant and powerful reading style to best serve their work. The course includes regular writing assignments in poetry and fiction and weekly performance and group discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yezzi, David D
  • Room: Merrick 200  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT, WRIT-POET

Advanced Poetry Workshop: Ambiguity and Clarity
AS.220.400 (01)

W. H. Auden once said that poetry might be defined as "the clear expression of mixed feelings." This course seeks to develop the techniques learned in introductory courses, and to ask subtler questions about how a poem develops as it proceeds. With models from all time periods, including the most contemporary, students will write poems that explore the values of both clarity and ambiguity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Salter, Mary Jo
  • Room: Gilman 381  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Advanced Fiction Workshop: Balancing a World
AS.220.401 (01)

Whether you write a short short story or an immense novel, fiction is largely a process of omission: What do you leave out? Successful fiction is typically a matter of balancing a world—selecting a few choice details to represent the world at large. How does a writer select these? What strategies can be used to reflect the complexities of a writer’s life? These are questions we will address in this class. Although most of our time will be devoted to workshopping student stories, outside readings to include: Rudyard Kipling, Vladimir Nabokov, Alice Munro.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Leithauser, Brad
  • Room: Maryland 109  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Advanced Fiction Workshop: Considering Contemporary Aesthetics
AS.220.401 (02)

Students will write and workshop two short stories and one work of flash fiction. In addition, students will read and write a 2-3 page critical paper on one story collection of their own choice, selected from a list of recently published options. The syllabus will include some selections by the instructor, along with one story from each book chosen by a student in the course, creating a collaborative brief survey of contemporary fiction. In reading discussions and workshop, we'll consider the intentions of the writer and think about how a story is shaped by both the writer's particular voice and interests and by the cultural moment in which the writer is working.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Evans, Danielle V
  • Room: Krieger 205  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore Schools
AS.220.415 (01)

In this course, students will work alongside writing teachers from the non-profit organization Writers in Baltimore Schools (WBS) to lead creative writing workshops in local public middle schools. Students and WBS teachers will also meet as a group once a week to plan classes, discuss pedagogy, and share ideas. Students will write weekly responses to reading assignments, write reflections on the volunteer experience, and help to assemble a final project at their worksite. Upon completion of the class, students will have the opportunity to apply to become instructors with Writers in Baltimore Schools.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Malech, Dora Rachel, Noel, Katharine
  • Room: Maryland 104  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

Science as Narrative
AS.220.424 (01)

Class reads the writings of scientists to explore what their words would have meant to them and their readers. Discussion will focus on the shifting scientific/cultural context throughout history. Authors include Aristotle, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, Heisenberg, Bohr, Crick and Watson.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Panek, Richard
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Readings in Poetry: International Voices
AS.220.443 (01)

International voices will combine the workshopping of poems by students with a study of contemporary poems written by black British writers and British writers in dialect, African-American writers, Caribbean writers, and Indian and South African poets who are writing in English. The study of broad themes and subjects will be combined with a particular appreciation of linguistic and acoustic matters - which means among other things that time will be spent listening to and evaluating recordings of the poets concerned. Writing Seminars Majors Only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Motion, Andrew P
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Playwriting Strategies
AS.225.330 (01)

A seminar and workshop in playwriting with Dr. Joe Martin, playwright and dramaturge. Student writers, developing their plays, will learn how to open up to the creative process, “brainstorm,” refine their work, and shape it toward an act of artistic communication. Writer’s techniques, such as attending to plot or “story,” delineation of character, creating effective “dialog,” even overcoming “writer’s block,” will be addressed. This course is designed to be complementary to – not a replacement for – playwriting classes in the Writing Seminars.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Martin, Joseph H
  • Room: Croft Hall G02  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard, Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura, Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.113 (01)FYS: The Poetry of Music - Lyrics and the Art of SongwritingT 3:00PM - 5:30PMCelenza, AnnaShaffer 302
 
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingTh 3:00PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206
 
FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.312 (01)The Fallen World: Morally Complex StorytellingT 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, LucyGilman 50
Gilman 10
FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.373 (01)Intermediate ScreenwritingF 1:00PM - 3:50PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206
 
FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.105 (01)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMHupp, Spencer MartinShriver Hall 001
 
AS.220.105 (02)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRaszick, Landen BlaineLatrobe 120
 
AS.220.105 (03)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMGuida, Dominic MichaelAmes 218
 
AS.220.105 (04)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMKessler, Brett CShriver Hall 001
 
AS.220.105 (05)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaffGilman 277
 
AS.220.105 (06)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMBrown, Davien AllenKrieger 205
 
AS.220.105 (07)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMEmmons, Eric DaytonGilman 17
 
AS.220.105 (08)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMKessler, Brett CShriver Hall 001
 
AS.220.105 (09)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBlansett, Nathan MichaelGilman 134
 
AS.220.105 (10)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMUllmann, Stephanie M 
 
AS.220.105 (11)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDuffy, Daniel JosephHodson 316
 
AS.220.105 (12)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStarr, MarloAmes 218
 
AS.220.105 (13)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFee, Gabriella M 
 
AS.220.105 (14)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBlansett, Nathan MichaelGilman 134
 
AS.220.105 (15)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStarr, MarloShaffer 300
 
AS.220.105 (16)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDuffy, Daniel JosephHodson 316
 
AS.220.105 (17)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMUllmann, Stephanie MAmes 218
 
AS.220.106 (01)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IIMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMNeugebauer, Samantha ElizabethHodson 316
 
AS.220.106 (02)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRobinson, Megan LGilman 55
 
AS.220.106 (03)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKeleher, Kate LaurenBloomberg 172
 
AS.220.106 (04)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRobinson, Megan LGilman 55
 
AS.220.106 (05)Introduction to Fiction & Poetry IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKeleher, Kate LaurenBloomberg 172
 
AS.220.108 (01)Introduction to Fiction & NonfictionT 5:30PM - 8:00PMBrown, Nathanael AGilman 138D
 
AS.220.200 (01)The Craft of Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic TensionM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRobinson, Shannon LShaffer 302
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.200 (02)The Craft of Fiction: Credible CharactersTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrown, Nathanael AAmes 320
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.200 (03)The Craft of Fiction: Lyric FictionF 1:30PM - 4:00PMArthur, James PGilman 277
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.201 (01)The Craft of Poetry: Elements and EffectsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMalech, Dora RachelGilman 277
 
WRIT-POET
AS.220.201 (02)The Craft of Poetry: Wit and DeliveryW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWilliamson, Greg WShaffer 300
 
WRIT-POET
AS.220.212 (01)Line and Lineage: Poems in TimeTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMArthur, James POlin 305
 
WRIT-POET
AS.220.220 (01)Reading Korean Literature in Translation: A SurveyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKim, Kyeong-sooHodson 301
 
AS.220.321 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Finishing Touches: How Stories EndW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLeithauser, BradOlin 305
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.338 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Developing SubtextT 3:00PM - 5:30PMBrown, Nathanael AGilman 132
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.377 (01)Intermediate Poetry: Poetic FormsTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMWilliamson, Greg WGilman 132
 
WRIT-POET
AS.220.391 (01)Performing Poetry & Fiction: An Acting Workshop for WritersM 1:30PM - 4:00PMYezzi, David DMerrick 200
 
WRIT-FICT, WRIT-POET
AS.220.400 (01)Advanced Poetry Workshop: Ambiguity and ClarityF 1:30PM - 4:00PMSalter, Mary JoGilman 381
 
WRIT-POET
AS.220.401 (01)Advanced Fiction Workshop: Balancing a WorldT 3:00PM - 5:30PMLeithauser, BradMaryland 109
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.401 (02)Advanced Fiction Workshop: Considering Contemporary AestheticsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMEvans, Danielle VKrieger 205
 
WRIT-FICT
AS.220.415 (01)Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore SchoolsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMMalech, Dora Rachel, Noel, KatharineMaryland 104
 
CSC-CE
AS.220.424 (01)Science as NarrativeT 1:30PM - 4:00PMPanek, Richard 
 
AS.220.443 (01)Readings in Poetry: International VoicesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMotion, Andrew P 
 
WRIT-POET
AS.225.330 (01)Playwriting StrategiesM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph HCroft Hall G02
 
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPatton, ElizabethMergenthaler 111
 
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBett, Richard, Patton, ElizabethMergenthaler 111
 
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDi Bianco, Laura, Patton, ElizabethMergenthaler 111