Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Characters for the Screenplay
AS.061.316 (01)

A workshop devoted to creating complex characters for the screen. Students will examine memorable film characters from the silent era to the present, with attention to how these characters are revealed through both the drama and the mise en scene. Weekly screenings. Short critical and creative written exercises and a longer, creative final project. Recommended Course Background: AS.061.148 OR AS.061.205 OR AS.061.265

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Bucknell, Lucy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (02)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Megan L
  • Room: Shriver Hall Board Room
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modernist Literature and Film
AS.061.218 (01)

This course explores the exchange of ideas and techniques between literary modernism and modernist cinema: how Virginia Woolf’s writings on the cinema connect with her use of shifting points-of-view as literary devices, how James Joyce influenced the Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein and how Eisenstein in turn influenced the American novelist John Dos Passos, how Franz Kafka's frequent trips to the movies reflect in his fiction, and how artists ventured broadly to develop experimental languages for expressing the new speeds and scales of modern life. Additional texts will be drawn from novels, essays, poems, and films from Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, Charlie Chaplin, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Anita Loos, Andrei Bely, Dziga Vertov, Gertrude Stein, Louis Aragon, and René Clair. The course fulfills the writing intensive requirement and involves a series of essays on literature and cinema from a critical perspective.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stine, Kyle J.
  • Room: Wolman MPR
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Advanced Screenwriting
AS.061.404 (01)

Intensive workshop course where students will write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Classes will focus on the specific challenges of the students’ works-in-progress, with an emphasis on developing a story idea that is suitable for a feature, and the craft to see it through to completion. Particular emphasis will be placed on the feature screenwriter’s central challenge: creating enough of a structure in the early writing stages to keep the screenplay on track, while remaining open to new ideas for scenes and sequences that inevitably arise as the characters come to life. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed—to explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. Students will aim to have a solid and workable first draft at the end of the semester, at which point avenues for further revision may be discussed. Throughout the course, Instructor will also devote a portion of class time to discuss the business of screenwriting. Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (03)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kessler, Brett C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (04)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Fetter, Journey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (07)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Keleher, Kate Lauren
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design, creation, and revision of the screenplay. Specifically, we will focus on learning the craft of screenwriting — strategies, processes, and philosophies that writers can develop, practice, and rely upon as they progress through a series of screenwriting exercises and write three short screenplays, which will be critiqued in-class during weekly table reads and with the Instructor (one-on-one) during office hours. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed — to further explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (01)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Duffy, Daniel Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (08)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (10)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fallis, Lewis B
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Poetics of Myth
AS.220.400 (01)

In this course we’ll explore poetic responses to myth and legend, looking at how poets from different cultures and eras have responded imaginatively to established stories about gods, heroes, and the supernatural, whether for the sake of aligning themselves with tradition, or for the sake of challenging it. Our discussions will take place in the context of a rigorous poetry workshop, where students will experiment with figurative language, management of the line, narrative organization, and the control of rhythm in both form and free verse. At the end of the semester students will turn in a final portfolio of revised poems, accompanied by a reflective letter that demonstrates a mature understanding of verse technique.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Arthur, James P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (18)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Bogdonoff, Emma Zahava
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (09)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Fiction: Writing about Adolescence
AS.220.363 (01)

Only fairly recently has adolescence been recognized as a developmental period distinct from childhood or adulthood. In this course, we'll read a range of classic and contemporary literature that takes on the challenge of writing about this complicated and fraught stage of life. Readings may include work by Shakespeare, Louisa May Alcott, Colson Whitehead, Louise Erdrich, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories or novel chapters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Noel, Katharine
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Reading Korean Literature in Translation: A Survey
AS.220.220 (01)

An introduction for students unfamiliar with the Korean language but interested in Korean culture / literature. Students will read a variety of translated texts, especially of works written in the 20th and early 21st centuries by authors including Kim Tong-in, Hwang Sun-wŏn, Pak Wansŏ, Hwang Sŏk-yŏng and Han Kang; there will also be classes on traditional sijo poetry. Students will become familiar with Korean literary genres and formal features, and develop a broad understanding of the historical and sociocultural context of Korean literature.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Kyeong-soo
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction & Nonfiction
AS.220.108 (01)

A course in realist fiction and nonfiction, with readings by Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James; George Orwell, Beryl Markham and Truman Capote. Students compose short stories and essays with attention to literary models. AS.220.105 can be substituted for AS.220.108.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
  • Instructor: Cavanaugh-Simpson, Joanne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Craft of Poetry: The Poet's Eye
AS.220.201 (02)

Poetry is, among other things, a form of paying close attention to the material world. ("No ideas but in things," wrote W.C. Williams.) We'll focus in this course on observing the world around us, as well as on thinking about modes of representation, visual and verbal, figurative and abstract. Readings will include essays about theories of ekphrasis, and a selection of poems about art. A part of class time will be spent writing poetry about works of art at Baltimore museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Salter, Mary Jo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Advanced Fiction Workshop: Surprise Me
AS.220.401 (02)

The capstone course in writing fiction, primarily devoted to workshop of student stories. Parallel texts and craft readings will focus on the nature of surprise in short fiction. This will include stories that make dramatic, surprising narrative turns and stories that "surprise" by subverting formal storytelling conventions. Two or three student stories will be workshopped and various short assignments will be completed over the course of the semester. Completion of Intermediate Fiction is required for admission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms
AS.220.377 (01)

Poetic Forms I fulfills one of the Intermediate requirements for The Writing Seminars Major. It deals with rhyme, meter, traditional forms, and ad hoc forms of students' own making. Whether you are a poet, novelist, song writer, science writer, or dramatist, this course will help you master lines and sentences even better.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Williamson, Greg W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

The Craft of Fiction: Character, Plot, and Setting
AS.220.200 (02)

In this introductory fiction workshop, students will practice writing their own short stories while considering how different authors have approached combining three basic elements of fiction: character, plot, and setting. Parallel readings will primarily come from contemporary work by writers like ZZ Packer, Paul Yoon, Bret Anthony Johnston, and Jenny Zhang, though we'll look at some classic stories from the 19th and 20th centuries as well.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (11)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Blansett, Nathan Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (12)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bogdonoff, Emma Zahava
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Craft of Poetry: Sounds and Sense
AS.220.201 (01)

We will consider an array of strategies for analyzing and writing lyric poetry, with a particular emphasis on prosodic elements such as meter and rhyme. Through a consideration of lyric, narrative, and dramatic techniques, such as song, description, dialogue, character, and situation, students will develop tools to enliven their appreciation and writing of verse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Yezzi, David D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (17)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Leary, Samuel Jeffrey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Fiction Workshop: Constructing a Complex, Multi-Scene Story
AS.220.401 (01)

Students will write many short scenes, selecting and developing one into a 20-25 short story. Readings in Chekhov and Joyce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: McGarry, Jean
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore Schools
AS.220.415 (01)

In this course, students will work alongside writing teachers from the non-profit organization Writers in Baltimore Schools (WBS) to lead creative writing workshops in local public middle schools. Students and WBS teachers will also meet as a group once a week to plan classes, discuss pedagogy, and share ideas. Students will write weekly responses to reading assignments, write reflections on the volunteer experience, and help to assemble a final project at their worksite. Upon completion of the class, students will have the opportunity to apply to become instructors with Writers in Baltimore Schools.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Noel, Katharine
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

The Craft of Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic Tension
AS.220.200 (01)

“[I]n literature, only trouble is interesting,” Janet Burroway says in Writing Fiction. Conflict is often referred to as the heart or the engine of a story: in this workshop-centered course, we’ll investigate conflict within short fiction, giving attention to all its related components, such as narrative structure, pacing, character development, and dialogue. Both in workshop and in our weekly discussions of assigned readings, we’ll always return to the question of how a story provokes readers’ sense of anticipation and keeps readers engaged. This course builds upon the material covered in the Introduction to Fiction and Poetry course sequence and will prepare students for further study at the Intermediate and Advanced levels. Course readings include diverse and contemporary authors such as Han Kang, Z.Z. Packer, Carmen Maria Machado, Haruki Murakami, George Saunders, and Curtis Sittenfeld.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Shannon L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (13)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (02)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Scalise, Gregory John
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Writing about Science I: Daily News Journalism
AS.220.206 (01)

This course is designed to teach students the skills of daily news reporting, with a focus on covering science news. Students will learn how turn scientific discoveries into lively and engaging prose for the general public, interview sources, and pitch stories to news organizations. The skills taught are applicable to all areas of journalism, not just science journalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Grimm, David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI

Performing Poetry & Fiction: An Acting Workshop for Writers
AS.220.391 (01)

This hands-on performance workshop, combining literary and theatrical practice, will look closely at what makes a performance or reading compelling, clear, and resonant. Through textual analysis, vocal technique, and group discussion, students will create a pliant and powerful reading style to best serve their work. The course includes regular writing assignments in poetry and fiction and weekly performance and group discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yezzi, David D
  • Room: Merrick 200
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT, WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (01)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Scalise, Gregory John
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (03)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dries, Emma D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Readings in Poetry: International Voices
AS.220.443 (01)

International voices will combine the workshopping of poems by students with a study of contemporary poems written by black British writers and British writers in dialect, African-American writers, Caribbean writers, and Indian and South African poets who are writing in English. The study of broad themes and subjects will be combined with a particular appreciation of linguistic and acoustic matters - which means among other things that time will be spent listening to and evaluating recordings of the poets concerned. Writing Seminars Majors Only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Motion, Andrew P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (04)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dries, Emma D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Readings in Fiction: Race, Passing, and Performance
AS.220.422 (01)

This course will explore the context and craft of racial passing texts in the U.S, asking students to think critically about literal passing narratives and their persistence over time, and more broadly about how we write about cultural passing, codeswitching, and identity as conscious performance. We’ll start with texts that ground us in the genre—Chopin, Larsen, Fauset, Ellison, and Morrison—and read our way into contemporary texts, potentially including work by Danzy Senna, Mat Johnson, Brit Bennett, Min Jin Lee, and Marcelo Hernandez Castillo. Students will write a critical paper, a craft paper, and a short story or novella.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Evans, Danielle V
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (14)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard, Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (16)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Fallis, Lewis B
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth, Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Intellectual History
AS.300.311 (01)

This course offers a conceptual and historical introduction to Intellectual History. What makes the “history of ideas” different from the history of other objects? What, if anything, distinguishes the history of ideas from the history of philosophy? What is it exactly that we call “ideas”? In what sense do they have a history? These are examples of the kind of questions addressed in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Playwriting Strategies
AS.225.330 (01)

A seminar and workshop in playwriting with Dr. Joe Martin, playwright and dramaturge. Student writers, developing their plays, will learn how to open up to the creative process, “brainstorm,” refine their work, and shape it toward an act of artistic communication. Writer’s techniques, such as attending to plot or “story,” delineation of character, creating effective “dialog,” even overcoming “writer’s block,” will be addressed. This course is designed to be complementary to – not a replacement for – playwriting classes in the Writing Seminars.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Martin, Joseph H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare and Ibsen
AS.300.323 (01)

William Shakespeare and Henrik Ibsen are the two most frequently performed playwrights in history, and both have been credited with reinventing drama: Shakespeare for the Elizabethan stage and Ibsen for the modern. In this course we will pair together plays by each author – those that stand in an explicit relation of influence as well as those that share a significant set of concerns – in order to investigate how each takes up and transform key problems in the literary, political, and philosophical tradition for their own historical moment. Plays to be studied: by Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, The Tempest, A Winter’s Tale; by Ibsen, St. John’s Night, Hedda Gabler, Rosmersholm, The Wild Duck, The Master Builder, When We Dead Awaken.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Tragic Tradition
AS.300.337 (01)

This course offers a broad survey of tragic drama in the Western tradition, from its origins in ancient Greece to the twentieth century. In weekly lectures and discussion sections, we will study the specific literary features and historical contexts of a range of different works, and trace the continuities and transformations that shape them into a unified tradition. Key questions and themes throughout the semester will include what counts as tragic, the tragedy of social and political conflict, the bearing of tragedy on the meaning and value of life, the antagonistic relation between world and humans, the promises and dangers of tragedy for contemporary culture. Authors to be studied: Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Goethe, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, Brecht, Pirandello, and Beckett.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (04)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth, Reese, Matthew
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.061.316 (01)Characters for the ScreenplayT 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, Lucy FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.105 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRobinson, Megan LShriver Hall Board Room
AS.061.218 (01)Modernist Literature and FilmTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStine, Kyle J.Wolman MPRFILM-CRITST
AS.061.404 (01)Advanced ScreenwritingF 1:00PM - 3:50PMRodgers, Adam F FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.105 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMKessler, Brett C 
AS.220.105 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMFetter, Journey 
AS.220.105 (07)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMKeleher, Kate Lauren 
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingTh 3:00PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam F FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.105 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDuffy, Daniel Joseph 
AS.220.105 (08)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStarr, Marlo 
AS.220.105 (10)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFallis, Lewis BGreenhouse 113
AS.220.400 (01)Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Poetics of MythF 1:30PM - 4:00PMArthur, James P WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (18)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBogdonoff, Emma Zahava 
AS.220.105 (09)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMUllmann, Stephanie M 
AS.220.363 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Writing about AdolescenceW 1:30PM - 4:00PMNoel, KatharineMaryland 217WRIT-FICT
AS.220.220 (01)Reading Korean Literature in Translation: A SurveyW 3:00PM - 5:30PMKim, Kyeong-sooMaryland 114
AS.220.108 (01)Introduction to Fiction & NonfictionT 6:00PM - 8:30PMCavanaugh-Simpson, Joanne 
AS.220.201 (02)The Craft of Poetry: The Poet's EyeM 3:00PM - 5:30PMSalter, Mary Jo WRIT-POET
AS.220.401 (02)Advanced Fiction Workshop: Surprise MeT 3:00PM - 5:30PMBrown, Nathanael A WRIT-FICT
AS.220.377 (01)Intermediate Poetry: Poetic FormsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWilliamson, Greg W WRIT-POET
AS.220.200 (02)The Craft of Fiction: Character, Plot, and SettingF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrown, Nathanael A WRIT-FICT
AS.220.105 (11)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBlansett, Nathan Michael 
AS.220.105 (12)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBogdonoff, Emma Zahava 
AS.220.201 (01)The Craft of Poetry: Sounds and SenseTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMYezzi, David D WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (17)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLeary, Samuel Jeffrey 
AS.220.401 (01)Advanced Fiction Workshop: Constructing a Complex, Multi-Scene StoryM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMcGarry, JeanGilman 277WRIT-FICT
AS.220.415 (01)Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore SchoolsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMNoel, Katharine CSC-CE
AS.220.200 (01)The Craft of Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic TensionM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRobinson, Shannon L WRIT-FICT
AS.220.105 (13)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStarr, Marlo 
AS.220.106 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMScalise, Gregory JohnGilman 413
AS.220.206 (01)Writing about Science I: Daily News JournalismF 1:30PM - 4:00PMGrimm, David MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.220.391 (01)Performing Poetry & Fiction: An Acting Workshop for WritersF 1:30PM - 4:00PMYezzi, David DMerrick 200WRIT-FICT, WRIT-POET
AS.220.106 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMScalise, Gregory JohnGilman 413
AS.220.106 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDries, Emma D 
AS.220.443 (01)Readings in Poetry: International VoicesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMMotion, Andrew P WRIT-POET
AS.220.106 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDries, Emma D 
AS.220.422 (01)Readings in Fiction: Race, Passing, and PerformanceTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMEvans, Danielle V WRIT-FICT
AS.220.105 (14)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMUllmann, Stephanie M 
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBett, Richard, Patton, ElizabethLevering Arellano
AS.220.105 (16)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMFallis, Lewis BGreenhouse 113
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, Elizabeth, Spinner, Samuel JacobLevering Arellano
AS.300.311 (01)Introduction to Intellectual HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, Paola INST-PT
AS.225.330 (01)Playwriting StrategiesW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph H 
AS.300.323 (01)Shakespeare and IbsenTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.337 (01)The Tragic TraditionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLisi, Leonardo 
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, ElizabethLevering Arellano
AS.360.133 (04)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, Elizabeth, Reese, MatthewLevering Arellano

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Modernist Literature and Film
AS.061.218 (01)

This course explores the exchange of ideas and techniques between literary modernism and modernist cinema: how Virginia Woolf’s writings on the cinema connect with her use of shifting points-of-view as literary devices, how James Joyce influenced the Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein and how Eisenstein in turn influenced the American novelist John Dos Passos, how Franz Kafka's frequent trips to the movies reflect in his fiction, and how artists ventured broadly to develop experimental languages for expressing the new speeds and scales of modern life. Additional texts will be drawn from novels, essays, poems, and films from Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, Charlie Chaplin, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Anita Loos, Andrei Bely, Dziga Vertov, Gertrude Stein, Louis Aragon, and René Clair. The course fulfills the writing intensive requirement and involves a series of essays on literature and cinema from a critical perspective.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stine, Kyle J.
  • Room: Wolman MPR
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): FILM-CRITST

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (03)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Kessler, Brett C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (04)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Fetter, Journey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (07)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Keleher, Kate Lauren
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design, creation, and revision of the screenplay. Specifically, we will focus on learning the craft of screenwriting — strategies, processes, and philosophies that writers can develop, practice, and rely upon as they progress through a series of screenwriting exercises and write three short screenplays, which will be critiqued in-class during weekly table reads and with the Instructor (one-on-one) during office hours. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed — to further explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Advanced Screenwriting
AS.061.404 (01)

Intensive workshop course where students will write a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Classes will focus on the specific challenges of the students’ works-in-progress, with an emphasis on developing a story idea that is suitable for a feature, and the craft to see it through to completion. Particular emphasis will be placed on the feature screenwriter’s central challenge: creating enough of a structure in the early writing stages to keep the screenplay on track, while remaining open to new ideas for scenes and sequences that inevitably arise as the characters come to life. Select professional screenplays will be read and analyzed — and clips from select films viewed—to explore what works well on the page, and how it translates to working well onscreen. Students will aim to have a solid and workable first draft at the end of the semester, at which point avenues for further revision may be discussed. Throughout the course, Instructor will also devote a portion of class time to discuss the business of screenwriting. Students will be required to purchase a license for Final Draft screenwriting software for $99.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Rodgers, Adam F
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (01)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Duffy, Daniel Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (08)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (09)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (02)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Megan L
  • Room: Shriver Hall Board Room
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (10)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fallis, Lewis B
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Characters for the Screenplay
AS.061.316 (01)

A workshop devoted to creating complex characters for the screen. Students will examine memorable film characters from the silent era to the present, with attention to how these characters are revealed through both the drama and the mise en scene. Weekly screenings. Short critical and creative written exercises and a longer, creative final project. Recommended Course Background: AS.061.148 OR AS.061.205 OR AS.061.265

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM Screenings
  • Instructor: Bucknell, Lucy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/9
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

The Craft of Poetry: The Poet's Eye
AS.220.201 (02)

Poetry is, among other things, a form of paying close attention to the material world. ("No ideas but in things," wrote W.C. Williams.) We'll focus in this course on observing the world around us, as well as on thinking about modes of representation, visual and verbal, figurative and abstract. Readings will include essays about theories of ekphrasis, and a selection of poems about art. A part of class time will be spent writing poetry about works of art at Baltimore museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Salter, Mary Jo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (14)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ullmann, Stephanie M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (04)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dries, Emma D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare and Ibsen
AS.300.323 (01)

William Shakespeare and Henrik Ibsen are the two most frequently performed playwrights in history, and both have been credited with reinventing drama: Shakespeare for the Elizabethan stage and Ibsen for the modern. In this course we will pair together plays by each author – those that stand in an explicit relation of influence as well as those that share a significant set of concerns – in order to investigate how each takes up and transform key problems in the literary, political, and philosophical tradition for their own historical moment. Plays to be studied: by Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, The Tempest, A Winter’s Tale; by Ibsen, St. John’s Night, Hedda Gabler, Rosmersholm, The Wild Duck, The Master Builder, When We Dead Awaken.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore Schools
AS.220.415 (01)

In this course, students will work alongside writing teachers from the non-profit organization Writers in Baltimore Schools (WBS) to lead creative writing workshops in local public middle schools. Students and WBS teachers will also meet as a group once a week to plan classes, discuss pedagogy, and share ideas. Students will write weekly responses to reading assignments, write reflections on the volunteer experience, and help to assemble a final project at their worksite. Upon completion of the class, students will have the opportunity to apply to become instructors with Writers in Baltimore Schools.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Noel, Katharine
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth, Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (13)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Starr, Marlo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms
AS.220.377 (01)

Poetic Forms I fulfills one of the Intermediate requirements for The Writing Seminars Major. It deals with rhyme, meter, traditional forms, and ad hoc forms of students' own making. Whether you are a poet, novelist, song writer, science writer, or dramatist, this course will help you master lines and sentences even better.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Williamson, Greg W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (18)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Bogdonoff, Emma Zahava
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Craft of Fiction: Character, Plot, and Setting
AS.220.200 (02)

In this introductory fiction workshop, students will practice writing their own short stories while considering how different authors have approached combining three basic elements of fiction: character, plot, and setting. Parallel readings will primarily come from contemporary work by writers like ZZ Packer, Paul Yoon, Bret Anthony Johnston, and Jenny Zhang, though we'll look at some classic stories from the 19th and 20th centuries as well.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Readings in Fiction: Race, Passing, and Performance
AS.220.422 (01)

This course will explore the context and craft of racial passing texts in the U.S, asking students to think critically about literal passing narratives and their persistence over time, and more broadly about how we write about cultural passing, codeswitching, and identity as conscious performance. We’ll start with texts that ground us in the genre—Chopin, Larsen, Fauset, Ellison, and Morrison—and read our way into contemporary texts, potentially including work by Danzy Senna, Mat Johnson, Brit Bennett, Min Jin Lee, and Marcelo Hernandez Castillo. Students will write a critical paper, a craft paper, and a short story or novella.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Evans, Danielle V
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (04)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth, Reese, Matthew
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (01)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Scalise, Gregory John
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (02)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Scalise, Gregory John
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (17)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Leary, Samuel Jeffrey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Writing about Science I: Daily News Journalism
AS.220.206 (01)

This course is designed to teach students the skills of daily news reporting, with a focus on covering science news. Students will learn how turn scientific discoveries into lively and engaging prose for the general public, interview sources, and pitch stories to news organizations. The skills taught are applicable to all areas of journalism, not just science journalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Grimm, David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (16)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Fallis, Lewis B
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Korean Literature in Translation: A Survey
AS.220.220 (01)

An introduction for students unfamiliar with the Korean language but interested in Korean culture / literature. Students will read a variety of translated texts, especially of works written in the 20th and early 21st centuries by authors including Kim Tong-in, Hwang Sun-wŏn, Pak Wansŏ, Hwang Sŏk-yŏng and Han Kang; there will also be classes on traditional sijo poetry. Students will become familiar with Korean literary genres and formal features, and develop a broad understanding of the historical and sociocultural context of Korean literature.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Kim, Kyeong-soo
  • Room: Maryland 114
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Fiction Workshop: Surprise Me
AS.220.401 (02)

The capstone course in writing fiction, primarily devoted to workshop of student stories. Parallel texts and craft readings will focus on the nature of surprise in short fiction. This will include stories that make dramatic, surprising narrative turns and stories that "surprise" by subverting formal storytelling conventions. Two or three student stories will be workshopped and various short assignments will be completed over the course of the semester. Completion of Intermediate Fiction is required for admission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Nathanael A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

The Craft of Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic Tension
AS.220.200 (01)

“[I]n literature, only trouble is interesting,” Janet Burroway says in Writing Fiction. Conflict is often referred to as the heart or the engine of a story: in this workshop-centered course, we’ll investigate conflict within short fiction, giving attention to all its related components, such as narrative structure, pacing, character development, and dialogue. Both in workshop and in our weekly discussions of assigned readings, we’ll always return to the question of how a story provokes readers’ sense of anticipation and keeps readers engaged. This course builds upon the material covered in the Introduction to Fiction and Poetry course sequence and will prepare students for further study at the Intermediate and Advanced levels. Course readings include diverse and contemporary authors such as Han Kang, Z.Z. Packer, Carmen Maria Machado, Haruki Murakami, George Saunders, and Curtis Sittenfeld.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Shannon L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Intermediate Fiction: Writing about Adolescence
AS.220.363 (01)

Only fairly recently has adolescence been recognized as a developmental period distinct from childhood or adulthood. In this course, we'll read a range of classic and contemporary literature that takes on the challenge of writing about this complicated and fraught stage of life. Readings may include work by Shakespeare, Louisa May Alcott, Colson Whitehead, Louise Erdrich, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories or novel chapters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Noel, Katharine
  • Room: Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (03)

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dries, Emma D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Performing Poetry & Fiction: An Acting Workshop for Writers
AS.220.391 (01)

This hands-on performance workshop, combining literary and theatrical practice, will look closely at what makes a performance or reading compelling, clear, and resonant. Through textual analysis, vocal technique, and group discussion, students will create a pliant and powerful reading style to best serve their work. The course includes regular writing assignments in poetry and fiction and weekly performance and group discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Yezzi, David D
  • Room: Merrick 200
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT, WRIT-POET

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Dante, Milton, Mary Shelley, Frederick Douglass, and Virginia Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard, Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Levering Arellano
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Fiction Workshop: Constructing a Complex, Multi-Scene Story
AS.220.401 (01)

Students will write many short scenes, selecting and developing one into a 20-25 short story. Readings in Chekhov and Joyce.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: McGarry, Jean
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Introduction to Intellectual History
AS.300.311 (01)

This course offers a conceptual and historical introduction to Intellectual History. What makes the “history of ideas” different from the history of other objects? What, if anything, distinguishes the history of ideas from the history of philosophy? What is it exactly that we call “ideas”? In what sense do they have a history? These are examples of the kind of questions addressed in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Introduction to Fiction & Nonfiction
AS.220.108 (01)

A course in realist fiction and nonfiction, with readings by Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James; George Orwell, Beryl Markham and Truman Capote. Students compose short stories and essays with attention to literary models. AS.220.105 can be substituted for AS.220.108.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
  • Instructor: Cavanaugh-Simpson, Joanne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Readings in Poetry: International Voices
AS.220.443 (01)

International voices will combine the workshopping of poems by students with a study of contemporary poems written by black British writers and British writers in dialect, African-American writers, Caribbean writers, and Indian and South African poets who are writing in English. The study of broad themes and subjects will be combined with a particular appreciation of linguistic and acoustic matters - which means among other things that time will be spent listening to and evaluating recordings of the poets concerned. Writing Seminars Majors Only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Motion, Andrew P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (11)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Blansett, Nathan Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Poetics of Myth
AS.220.400 (01)

In this course we’ll explore poetic responses to myth and legend, looking at how poets from different cultures and eras have responded imaginatively to established stories about gods, heroes, and the supernatural, whether for the sake of aligning themselves with tradition, or for the sake of challenging it. Our discussions will take place in the context of a rigorous poetry workshop, where students will experiment with figurative language, management of the line, narrative organization, and the control of rhythm in both form and free verse. At the end of the semester students will turn in a final portfolio of revised poems, accompanied by a reflective letter that demonstrates a mature understanding of verse technique.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Arthur, James P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (12)

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bogdonoff, Emma Zahava
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Playwriting Strategies
AS.225.330 (01)

A seminar and workshop in playwriting with Dr. Joe Martin, playwright and dramaturge. Student writers, developing their plays, will learn how to open up to the creative process, “brainstorm,” refine their work, and shape it toward an act of artistic communication. Writer’s techniques, such as attending to plot or “story,” delineation of character, creating effective “dialog,” even overcoming “writer’s block,” will be addressed. This course is designed to be complementary to – not a replacement for – playwriting classes in the Writing Seminars.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Martin, Joseph H
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Craft of Poetry: Sounds and Sense
AS.220.201 (01)

We will consider an array of strategies for analyzing and writing lyric poetry, with a particular emphasis on prosodic elements such as meter and rhyme. Through a consideration of lyric, narrative, and dramatic techniques, such as song, description, dialogue, character, and situation, students will develop tools to enliven their appreciation and writing of verse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Yezzi, David D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

The Tragic Tradition
AS.300.337 (01)

This course offers a broad survey of tragic drama in the Western tradition, from its origins in ancient Greece to the twentieth century. In weekly lectures and discussion sections, we will study the specific literary features and historical contexts of a range of different works, and trace the continuities and transformations that shape them into a unified tradition. Key questions and themes throughout the semester will include what counts as tragic, the tragedy of social and political conflict, the bearing of tragedy on the meaning and value of life, the antagonistic relation between world and humans, the promises and dangers of tragedy for contemporary culture. Authors to be studied: Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Goethe, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, Brecht, Pirandello, and Beckett.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.061.218 (01)Modernist Literature and FilmTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStine, Kyle J.Wolman MPRFILM-CRITST
AS.220.105 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMKessler, Brett C 
AS.220.105 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMFetter, Journey 
AS.220.105 (07)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMKeleher, Kate Lauren 
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingTh 3:00PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam F FILM-SCRWRT
AS.061.404 (01)Advanced ScreenwritingF 1:00PM - 3:50PMRodgers, Adam F FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.105 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDuffy, Daniel Joseph 
AS.220.105 (08)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStarr, Marlo 
AS.220.105 (09)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMUllmann, Stephanie M 
AS.220.105 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRobinson, Megan LShriver Hall Board Room
AS.220.105 (10)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFallis, Lewis BGreenhouse 113
AS.061.316 (01)Characters for the ScreenplayT 3:00PM - 5:20PM, M 7:30PM - 10:00PM ScreeningsBucknell, Lucy FILM-SCRWRT
AS.220.201 (02)The Craft of Poetry: The Poet's EyeM 3:00PM - 5:30PMSalter, Mary Jo WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (14)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMUllmann, Stephanie M 
AS.220.106 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDries, Emma D 
AS.300.323 (01)Shakespeare and IbsenTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLisi, Leonardo 
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, ElizabethLevering Arellano
AS.220.415 (01)Community-Based Learning: Teaching Creative Writing in Baltimore SchoolsM 4:00PM - 6:30PMNoel, Katharine CSC-CE
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, Elizabeth, Spinner, Samuel JacobLevering Arellano
AS.220.105 (13)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStarr, Marlo 
AS.220.377 (01)Intermediate Poetry: Poetic FormsW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWilliamson, Greg W WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (18)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBogdonoff, Emma Zahava 
AS.220.200 (02)The Craft of Fiction: Character, Plot, and SettingF 1:30PM - 4:00PMBrown, Nathanael A WRIT-FICT
AS.220.422 (01)Readings in Fiction: Race, Passing, and PerformanceTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMEvans, Danielle V WRIT-FICT
AS.360.133 (04)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, Elizabeth, Reese, MatthewLevering Arellano
AS.220.106 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMScalise, Gregory JohnGilman 413
AS.220.106 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMScalise, Gregory JohnGilman 413
AS.220.105 (17)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLeary, Samuel Jeffrey 
AS.220.206 (01)Writing about Science I: Daily News JournalismF 1:30PM - 4:00PMGrimm, David MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.220.105 (16)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMFallis, Lewis BGreenhouse 113
AS.220.220 (01)Reading Korean Literature in Translation: A SurveyW 3:00PM - 5:30PMKim, Kyeong-sooMaryland 114
AS.220.401 (02)Advanced Fiction Workshop: Surprise MeT 3:00PM - 5:30PMBrown, Nathanael A WRIT-FICT
AS.220.200 (01)The Craft of Fiction: Conflict and Dramatic TensionM 1:30PM - 4:00PMRobinson, Shannon L WRIT-FICT
AS.220.363 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Writing about AdolescenceW 1:30PM - 4:00PMNoel, KatharineMaryland 217WRIT-FICT
AS.220.106 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDries, Emma D 
AS.220.391 (01)Performing Poetry & Fiction: An Acting Workshop for WritersF 1:30PM - 4:00PMYezzi, David DMerrick 200WRIT-FICT, WRIT-POET
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBett, Richard, Patton, ElizabethLevering Arellano
AS.220.401 (01)Advanced Fiction Workshop: Constructing a Complex, Multi-Scene StoryM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMcGarry, JeanGilman 277WRIT-FICT
AS.300.311 (01)Introduction to Intellectual HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, Paola INST-PT
AS.220.108 (01)Introduction to Fiction & NonfictionT 6:00PM - 8:30PMCavanaugh-Simpson, Joanne 
AS.220.443 (01)Readings in Poetry: International VoicesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMMotion, Andrew P WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (11)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBlansett, Nathan Michael 
AS.220.400 (01)Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Poetics of MythF 1:30PM - 4:00PMArthur, James P WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (12)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBogdonoff, Emma Zahava 
AS.225.330 (01)Playwriting StrategiesW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph H 
AS.220.201 (01)The Craft of Poetry: Sounds and SenseTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMYezzi, David D WRIT-POET
AS.300.337 (01)The Tragic TraditionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLisi, Leonardo