Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (05)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/7
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (06)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/7
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (01)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (04)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/7
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Screenwriting
AS.061.205 (01)

In this course we will explore the basic principles of visual storytelling in narrative film as they apply to the design and execution of a screenplay. During the course of the semester, each student will work on different writing exercises while they search for their specific story and the best way to approach it. We will study different narrative tools and methods of screenwriting by analyzing films to ascertain how they work or fail to do so at script level. Through in-class critiques, group discussions and one-on-one sessions, students will apply these techniques to their own work as they undergo the process of designing, breaking down, outlining and writing a screenplay for a short film. In-class analysis and debate on the strengths and challenges posed by the students' work will help shape the thematic emphasis of the second half of the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): FILM-SCRWRT

Borges: His Fiction and Critical Essays
AS.215.463 (01)

This course will deal with close readings of Borges ficciones and critical essays in order to determine how his thinking on the problem of writing and thinking is fictionalized in his stories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (03)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

War in Israeli Arts and Culture
AS.216.373 (01)

In this course we will study the various representations of what functions as one of Israel’s most unifying and yet dividing forces: war. By analyzing literary and cinematic works as well as visual art and popular culture we will attempt to understand the role of war in shaping Israeli society, culture and politics. Topics such as commemoration and mourning, heroism, dissent and protest, trauma and memory and the changing image of the soldier will stand at the center of the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

War in Israeli Arts and Culture
AS.216.373 (02)

In this course we will study the various representations of what functions as one of Israel’s most unifying and yet dividing forces: war. By analyzing literary and cinematic works as well as visual art and popular culture we will attempt to understand the role of war in shaping Israeli society, culture and politics. Topics such as commemoration and mourning, heroism, dissent and protest, trauma and memory and the changing image of the soldier will stand at the center of the course.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/3
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (02)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (07)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (08)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (09)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction
AS.220.200 (02)

Study in the reading and writing of short narrative with focus on basic technique: subject, narrative voice, character, sense of an ending, etc. Students will write weekly sketches, present story analyses in class, and workshop one finished story. Selected parallel readings from such models of the form as Henry James, Anton Chekov, James Joyce, John Cheever, Alice Munro, and others. Permission Required. (Formerly AS.220.191.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Readings in Fiction: Doing Likewise: Imitation, Continuation, Updating, Upending
AS.220.451 (01)

In this course, we will look at stories and novels that, in one way or another, riff on the work of other authors. We’ll consider both the old work and the new. Written assignments will consist of doing the same.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Reading Proust
AS.220.452 (01)

An excursion through the 3,000 page, seven-volume masterpiece, *In Search of Lost Time.* We will closely read *Swann’s Way* and *Within a Budding Grove*; we will cover, in a less intensive way, *Guermantes Way*, and *Time Regained*.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Border Crossings: Contemporary Writing from Canada
AS.220.453 (01)

A survey of contemporary Canadian poetry and fiction. Course readings will include work by Margaret Atwood, Christian Bök, Anne Carson, Anne Michaels, Alice Munro, Michael Ondaatje, Madeleine Thien, and others. Students will have the opportunity to respond artistically as well as analytically to the course readings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (13)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction
AS.220.200 (01)

Study in the reading and writing of short narrative with focus on basic technique: subject, narrative voice, character, sense of an ending, etc. Students will write weekly sketches, present story analyses in class, and workshop one finished story. Selected parallel readings from such models of the form as Henry James, Anton Chekov, James Joyce, John Cheever, Alice Munro, and others. Permission Required. (Formerly AS.220.191.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (03)

The second half of IFP, a course in counter-traditional antirealist fiction and free verse (Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bishop, Franz Kafka, Italo Calvino, and William Carlos Williams). This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Fiction: Point of View
AS.220.311 (01)

In this course, we will workshop student short stories, complete short writing exercises, and discuss published writing with an emphasis on the possibilities of point of view. We will explore the opportunities and challenges of writing in first, second, and third person, think about how narrative distance and tense complicate these choices, and connect narrative voice to story shape and structure.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Introduction to Poetry
AS.220.201 (01)

A study of the fundamentals and strategies of poetry writing. This course combines analysis and discussion of traditional models of poetry with workshop critiques of student poems and student conferences with the instructor. (Formerly AS.220.141)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Writing about Science I: Daily News Journalism
AS.220.206 (01)

This course is designed to teach students the skills of daily news reporting, with a focus on covering science news. Students will learn how turn scientific discoveries into lively and engaging prose for the general public, interview sources, and pitch stories to news organizations. The skills taught are applicable to all areas of journalism, not just science journalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (14)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Fiction
AS.220.200 (03)

Study in the reading and writing of short narrative with focus on basic technique: subject, narrative voice, character, sense of an ending, etc. Students will write weekly sketches, present story analyses in class, and workshop one finished story. Selected parallel readings from such models of the form as Henry James, Anton Chekov, James Joyce, John Cheever, Alice Munro, and others. Permission Required. (Formerly AS.220.191.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Readings in Fiction and Literary Nonfiction
AS.220.219 (01)

This course offers an in-depth exploration of content, style, and crossover literary techniques among authors who write both fiction and nonfiction, including Jamaica Kincaid's memoir My Brother and "Girl." Students will evaluate why each genre was chosen to narrate, for example, such quandaries as ethics in surgery: Abraham Verghese's novel Cutting for Stone and Richard Selzer's essay, "The Knife," as well as the reportage and novels of Ernest Hemingway and others. Also explored: topics of social import and questions of identity in James Baldwin's essays ("Notes of a Native Son") and stories ("Sonny's Blues"), and other works; The course builds on literary writing and reading techniques established in Intro to Fiction & Nonfiction (IFN) and Intro to Fiction & Poetry (IFP). Either course is a prerequisite, with IFN preferred.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (18)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/11
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (21)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Non-Fiction: Science as a Social Activity
AS.220.210 (01)

Using the political and economic milieu of science and technology as a context for our writing, we will study how social factors such as government, money, secrecy, and ethics affect the conduct and public presentation of scientific and medical research. Controversies from 20th century history as well as current events will be discussed. Writing assignments to satisfy the W requirement will consist of short papers derived from classroom topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (10)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (17)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (16)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (12)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (11)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Poetry
AS.220.201 (02)

A study of the fundamentals and strategies of poetry writing. This course combines analysis and discussion of traditional models of poetry with workshop critiques of student poems and student conferences with the instructor. (Formerly AS.220.141)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Line and Lineage: A Survey of Poetry Writing
AS.220.212 (01)

In this lecture-based course, students will build their knowledge of the history of poetry writing in English through a chronological exploration of the poetic line. This course will serve as a foundation for future studies in the writing and reading of poetry.​

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction Survey: Once Upon a Time
AS.220.213 (01)

A review of the origins and development of the realist short story from fable, fairy tale, saint’s life, Bible story, through versions created in the Renaissance and classic (19th and 20th century) periods, to modern narratives. Writing Seminars majors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (04)

The second half of IFP, a course in counter-traditional antirealist fiction and free verse (Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bishop, Franz Kafka, Italo Calvino, and William Carlos Williams). This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (01)

The second half of IFP, a course in counter-traditional antirealist fiction and free verse (Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bishop, Franz Kafka, Italo Calvino, and William Carlos Williams). This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.106 (02)

The second half of IFP, a course in counter-traditional antirealist fiction and free verse (Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bishop, Franz Kafka, Italo Calvino, and William Carlos Williams). This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (20)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (19)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Fiction/Poetry Writing I
AS.220.105 (15)

A course in realist fiction and traditional verse, with readings in Eudora Welty, Vladimir Nabokov, Henry James, Robert Frost, Paul Fussell, John Gardner, Seamus Heane, and Gwendolyn Brooks. This first course for writers is a study of forms of short fiction and metered verse. Students compose short stories and poems; includes practice of critical attention to literary models and workshop of student writing. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Nonfiction in the Post-Factual Era
AS.220.371 (01)

When facts are widely ignored or mistrusted in public discourse, what happens to nonfiction as a genre? We will consider the current state of various political and scientific debates, examine historical precedents, and search for practical solutions in nonfiction writing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms II
AS.220.378 (01)

This course builds on the information and techniques encountered in Poetic Forms I and uses them in reading and imitating a range of contemporary poets. Please note, however, Poetic Forms I is NOT a prerequisite for Poetic Forms II.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Readings in Poetry: Shakespeare and Company
AS.220.441 (01)

A study of three of Shakespeare’s plays, and of some of the most important creative responses to these plays by modern writers, such as Auden and Stoppard. Students will familiarize themselves with Shakespeare’s continuing place in contemporary culture, and write short critical responses; they will also write a longer creative work that in some way transforms one of Shakespeare's plays.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Readings in Poetry: International Voices
AS.220.443 (01)

International voices will combine the workshopping of poems by students with a study of contemporary poems written by black British writers and British writers in dialect, African-American writers, Caribbean writers, and Indian and South African poets who are writing in English. The study of broad themes and subjects will be combined with a particular appreciation of linguistic and acoustic matters - which means among other things that time will be spent listening to and evaluating recordings of the poets concerned. Writing Seminars Majors Only

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms
AS.220.377 (01)

Poetic Forms I fulfills one of the Intermediate requirements for The Writing Seminars Major. It deals with rhyme, meter, traditional forms, and ad hoc forms of students' own making. Whether you are a poet, novelist, song writer, science writer, or dramatist, this course will help you master lines and sentences even better.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Advanced Poetry Workshop
AS.220.400 (01)

The capstone course in poetry writing. Consideration of various poetic models in discussion, some assigned writing, primarily workshop of student poems. Students will usually complete a “collection” of poems. (Formerly AS.220.396.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Intermediate Fiction: Detail and Description
AS.220.312 (01)

An intermediate workshop focusing on the question of how to make fictional worlds feel real. We'll read 19th, 20th, and 21st century short fiction by authors such as Anton Chekhov, Jhumpa Lahiri, Junot Diaz, and Alice Munro, focusing particularly on how authors make the lives on the page feel three-dimensional. Students will write stories and exercises, including exercises that involve exploring Baltimore in order to observe and write about the city in which we live. Recommend Course Background: Students need to have completed a 200-level Writing Seminars course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Advanced Fiction Workshop
AS.220.401 (01)

The capstone course in writing fiction, primarily devoted to workshop of student stories. Some assignments, some discussion of literary models, two or three completed student stories with revisions. Completion of Intermediate Fiction is required for admission. (Formerly AS.220.355)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Advanced Fiction Workshop
AS.220.401 (02)

The capstone course in writing fiction, primarily devoted to workshop of student stories. Some assignments, some discussion of literary models, two or three completed student stories with revisions. Completion of Intermediate Fiction is required for admission. (Formerly AS.220.355)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-FICT

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (05)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Journalism and Opinion
AS.220.314 (01)

Students will learn about writing op-eds, reviews and feature articles, analyzing a broad range of examples and producing their own work in each category. The course will place a particular emphasis on op-ed-writing as a valuable skill to possess on any career path.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

From Treasure House to Production House: Exploring New Roles for the Museum in the 21st Century
AS.389.311 (01)

Students work with the Director of, the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture as it reinvents itself as a museum for the twenty-first century. Involves working with community story-tellers in residence. Extra time is to allow for field trip travel - most days class runs 1:30-3:50.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC

The Tragic Tradition
AS.300.337 (02)

This course offers a broad survey of tragic drama in the Western tradition, from its origins in ancient Greece to the twentieth century. In weekly lectures and discussion sections, we will study the specific literary features and historical contexts of a range of different works, and trace the continuities and transformations that shape them into a unified tradition. Key questions and themes throughout the semester will include what counts as tragic, the tragedy of social and political conflict, the bearing of tragedy on the meaning and value of life, the antagonistic relation between world and humans, the promises and dangers of tragedy for contemporary culture. Authors to be studied: Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Goethe, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, Brecht, Pirandello, and Beckett.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Playwriting Strategies
AS.225.330 (01)

A seminar and workshop in playwriting with Dr. Joe Martin, playwright and dramaturge. Student writers, developing their plays, will learn how to open up to the creative process, “brainstorm,” refine their work, and shape it toward an act of artistic communication. Writer’s techniques, such as attending to plot or “story,” delineation of character, creating effective “dialog,” even overcoming “writer’s block,” will be addressed. This course is designed to be complementary to – not a replacement for – playwriting classes in the Writing Seminars.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan England
AS.363.445 (01)

If Shakespeare had a sister who went to London to be a writer, what would she write? Virginia Woolf’s account of the thwarted career of Shakespeare’s hypothetical sister, Judith, in A Room of One’s Own frames our reading of plays and poetry by Shakespeare and contemporary women writers, including Isabella Whitney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney, Aemelia Lanyer, and Mary Wroth. Working within a selected historical context, students will create fictional biographies of “Judith Shakespeare,” including her perspective on our identified authors and a sample or description of Judith’s own literary accomplishments. Secondary course readings will reflect contemporary economic, political, and religious contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Comparative Literature
AS.300.339 (01)

This course offers an introduction to the history, theory, and praxis of comparative literature. We will read texts from some of the founding figures of the discipline and look at the most recent debates in the field, including translation studies, literary theory, and world literature, among others. Particular attention will be given to the methodologies and problems of studying literatures in different linguistic traditions and the relation between literature and other areas of thought and culture, such as philosophy, art history, and psychoanalysis. Case studies in comparative approaches to literature will provide concrete examples to our discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar:Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (04)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Intellectual History
AS.300.311 (01)

This course offers a conceptual and historical introduction to Intellectual History. What makes the “history of ideas” different from the history of other objects? What, if anything, distinguishes the history of ideas from the history of philosophy? What is it exactly that we call “ideas”? In what sense do they have a history? These are examples of the kind of questions addressed in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Author/Canon/Archive
AS.389.329 (01)

Why are some literary works from the past reprinted, anthologized, and considered worthy of study, but not others? Why are some works “lost” and some “rediscovered,” while others simply fall out of favor? Focusing on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literary culture, we will use rare books and archival materials from JHU collections to examine Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, and Zora Neale Hurston, along with a few authors you’ve never heard of, in terms of the relationship between authorship, stewardship, and status.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Tragic Tradition
AS.300.337 (01)

This course offers a broad survey of tragic drama in the Western tradition, from its origins in ancient Greece to the twentieth century. In weekly lectures and discussion sections, we will study the specific literary features and historical contexts of a range of different works, and trace the continuities and transformations that shape them into a unified tradition. Key questions and themes throughout the semester will include what counts as tragic, the tragedy of social and political conflict, the bearing of tragedy on the meaning and value of life, the antagonistic relation between world and humans, the promises and dangers of tragedy for contemporary culture. Authors to be studied: Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, Racine, Goethe, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, Brecht, Pirandello, and Beckett.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.220.105 (05)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMKemler, Kimberly RGilman 134
AS.220.105 (06)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMDanklin, Deirdre MaureenKrieger Laverty
AS.220.105 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMAtherton, Chase ElizabethLevering Conf. A
AS.220.105 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMCheney, Samuel DSmokler Center Library
AS.061.205 (01)Introduction to ScreenwritingF 3:00PM - 5:50PMRodgers, Adam FThe Centre 206FILM-SCRWRT
AS.215.463 (01)Borges: His Fiction and Critical EssaysW 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraGilman 479
AS.220.105 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMRentz, Aleyna SophiaWolman MPR
AS.216.373 (01)War in Israeli Arts and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.216.373 (02)War in Israeli Arts and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCohen, Zvi, Stahl, NetaGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.220.105 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCrigger, Catherine HaleyGilman 79
AS.220.105 (07)Fiction/Poetry Writing IMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMNguyen, Nancy Ha-anh 
AS.220.105 (08)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDoyle, Sydney KatherineGilman 138D
AS.220.105 (09)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBeckwith, Thomas DavidChar Cmns 324
AS.220.200 (02)Introduction to FictionF 1:30PM - 3:50PMPuchner, Roderic PGreenhouse 113WRIT-FICT
AS.220.451 (01)Readings in Fiction: Doing Likewise: Imitation, Continuation, Updating, UpendingT 3:00PM - 5:20PMMcDermott, AliceGilman 219WRIT-FICT
AS.220.452 (01)Reading ProustM 1:30PM - 3:50PMMcGarry, Jean WRIT-FICT
AS.220.453 (01)Border Crossings: Contemporary Writing from CanadaF 1:30PM - 3:50PMArthur, James PGilman 55WRIT-POET
AS.220.105 (13)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDoyle, Sydney KatherineGilman 138D
AS.220.200 (01)Introduction to FictionM 3:00PM - 5:20PMDavies, TristanHodson 211WRIT-FICT
AS.220.106 (03)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPereira Espinosa, RosaliGilman 219
AS.220.311 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Point of ViewTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMEvans, Danielle VBloomberg 276WRIT-FICT
AS.220.201 (01)Introduction to PoetryT 1:30PM - 3:50PMMalech, Dora RachelMergenthaler 111WRIT-POET
AS.220.206 (01)Writing about Science I: Daily News JournalismF 4:00PM - 6:20PMGrimm, DavidGilman 277MSCH-HUM, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.220.105 (14)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBeckwith, Thomas DavidChar Cmns 324
AS.220.200 (03)Introduction to FictionW 1:30PM - 3:50PMNoel, KatharineGreenhouse 113WRIT-FICT
AS.220.219 (01)Readings in Fiction and Literary NonfictionT 6:00PM - 8:30PMCavanaugh-Simpson, JoanneGilman 138D
AS.220.105 (18)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMShea, Hannah Marie VadaHodson 110
AS.220.105 (21)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRobinson, Shannon LGilman 377
AS.220.210 (01)Introduction to Non-Fiction: Science as a Social ActivityTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMBiddle, WayneKrieger 308MSCH-HUM
AS.220.105 (10)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMClifford, Rachael UGilman 79
AS.220.105 (17)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSharpe, Katherine GWolman MPR
AS.220.105 (16)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMClifford, Rachael UGilman 186
AS.220.105 (12)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMShea, Hannah Marie VadaMaryland 114
AS.220.105 (11)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSharpe, Katherine GWolman MPR
AS.220.201 (02)Introduction to PoetryTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMGreer, Songmuang SGilman 35WRIT-POET
AS.220.212 (01)Line and Lineage: A Survey of Poetry WritingM 1:30PM - 3:50PMMalech, Dora Rachel 
AS.220.213 (01)Fiction Survey: Once Upon a TimeW 1:30PM - 3:50PMMcGarry, JeanKrieger 300
AS.220.106 (04)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBroida, Michael EGilman 186
AS.220.106 (01)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPereira Espinosa, RosaliGilman 219
AS.220.106 (02)Fiction/Poetry Writing IITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBroida, Michael EGilman 186
AS.220.105 (20)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRobinson, Shannon LGilman 377
AS.220.105 (19)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMEutsey, Jalen ABloomberg 172
AS.220.105 (15)Fiction/Poetry Writing ITTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEutsey, Jalen ABloomberg 172
AS.220.371 (01)Nonfiction in the Post-Factual EraW 1:30PM - 3:50PMBiddle, WayneGilman 79
AS.220.378 (01)Intermediate Poetry: Poetic Forms IIW 1:30PM - 3:50PMWilliamson, Greg W WRIT-POET
AS.220.441 (01)Readings in Poetry: Shakespeare and CompanyTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMSalter, Mary Jo WRIT-POET
AS.220.443 (01)Readings in Poetry: International VoicesT 1:30PM - 3:50PMMotion, Andrew PGilman 35WRIT-POET
AS.220.377 (01)Intermediate Poetry: Poetic FormsM 3:00PM - 5:20PMWilliamson, Greg WKrieger 304WRIT-POET
AS.220.400 (01)Advanced Poetry WorkshopF 1:30PM - 3:50PMMalech, Dora RachelGilman 79WRIT-POET
AS.220.312 (01)Intermediate Fiction: Detail and DescriptionM 1:30PM - 3:50PMNoel, KatharineGreenhouse 113WRIT-FICT
AS.220.401 (01)Advanced Fiction WorkshopT 3:00PM - 5:20PMDavies, TristanMaryland 217WRIT-FICT
AS.220.401 (02)Advanced Fiction WorkshopW 1:30PM - 3:50PMLeithauser, BradGilman 219WRIT-FICT
AS.360.133 (05)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWeiss, Susan ForscherLevering Arellano
AS.220.314 (01)Journalism and OpinionT 1:30PM - 3:50PMLasswell, Mark ARemsen Hall 1
AS.389.311 (01)From Treasure House to Production House: Exploring New Roles for the Museum in the 21st CenturyF 1:30PM - 5:00PMProctor, NancyHodson 313PMUS-PRAC
AS.300.337 (02)The Tragic TraditionMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLisi, Leonardo GRLL-ENGL
AS.225.330 (01)Playwriting StrategiesW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMartin, Joseph HKrieger 304
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDaniel, AndrewLevering Arellano
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWeiss, Susan ForscherLevering Arellano
AS.363.445 (01)Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan EnglandW 1:30PM - 4:00PMPatton, ElizabethMergenthaler 431
AS.300.339 (01)Introduction to Comparative LiteratureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208
AS.360.133 (04)Freshman Seminar:Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRefini, EugenioLevering Arellano
AS.300.311 (01)Introduction to Intellectual HistoryTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, Paola, Sirin, HaleGilman 208INST-PT
AS.389.329 (01)Author/Canon/ArchiveT 4:00PM - 6:20PMDean, GabrielleBLC Macksey
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMEgginton, WilliamLevering Arellano
AS.300.337 (01)The Tragic TraditionMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208GRLL-ENGL